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the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the russians. >> they don't want to bail out the depositors because they are mainly russians. that's what the issue is. >> so finance makers said depositors are going be compensated. but with the stock market down some 60 percent those chairs are essentially wortless. >> the blanks are closed and won't open until votes on the bailout measure. people are waiting in lines at atms to withdraw money from their accounts and countries are worried around the world that citizens would take money out of their banks that's why even the most seasoned wall street veterans watching what happens in the tiny island in the mediterranean. for "nightly business report" i'm sue herrera. >> so what does it mean to american investors? we turn to the ceo of pimco the world's largest bond fund. i asked if the situation in cypress is unique or is it a serious issue for the u.s.? >> it is mai
to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the show presumably the germans in the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community citing your com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to its roots. the banking depends on trust. he wrote a note to his clients trust that has now been shattered, broken and destroyed. jim o'neal at goldman sachs says astonishing with very little thought of containing. >> bailout 101 is you want to keep the money in the banks. you want to avoid a run on the banks. you want to avoid where people are standing outside wanting their cash be
for future bailouts. but making large depositors pay will hurt the wider economy, too. and that's the big question. yes, cyprus has been saved from bankruptcy and will remain in the euro zone, but at what price? some are estimating that with the reduction in the banking sector and with higher taxes, the cypriot economy could shrink by 10%. with years of hardship. and that is the big unknown. will the rescue end uncertainty or will cyprus end up like some of the other bailed out countries, with a lost generation, facing recession and job losses? >> pretty grim prospects in cyprus. and in a speech to the cypriot people tonight, the president called the deal painful but he said it was the best he could get. for more on the reaction there, i spoke to the bb's tim wilcox. we have now some clarity on the deal that cyprus has struck with europe. does it look like the island's actually going to be worse off because of this? >> it's instinct because i've just been talking to one of the m.p.'s who voted against the proposals last week, which was going to have a 10% levy or hair cut on deposits over
were born in rome. >> i was born in rome and raised in rome. >> rose: the pope, the economy, the smart phone and a tour of rome when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with continued analysis of the historic events in rome. all eyes on the vatican. on wednesday evening, jorge berguliglo many saw him as a surprise choice. he's the first jesuit. pope francis is known for humanity and long time service to the poor. he inherits a troubled church much reconciled tradition with a modernizing world. joining me now in rome and new york, monsignor lorenzo al katie and frank bruni and on the phone from rome daniel wakin to talk about what has happened since the selection of the new pope -- why this pope. >> two main reasons. one is significant cardinals really did want to go in a different direction. i think they wanted someone that into of could interject a hint of humanity and solidarity with the poor. a tough administrator. and the other part which is hard to figure out is due to the
's effort to stimulate the economy. and the fed chairman made comments about what's going on in cyprus and the economic and financial difficulties in that small country. >> so a lot of uncertainties and questions about how the way cyprus has created for other countries and the like. it does have some consequence. having said that, you know, the vote failed and the markets are up today. and i don't think that the impact has been enormous. >> finally, the federal reserve in its statement for the first time made mention of fiscal restraint, which is another way of saying the sequestration that many analysts did not think was going to happen. fed chairman did say that he has concerns that reducing federal spending could reduce economic growth. back to you guys. >> well, two big companies that could be considered bellwether to the economy had two big misses today. oracle, the world's third largest software maker came in shy as new software sales sell. on the numbers, oracle shares took a big hit. >>> and the other miss, fed-ex, the company reported weakness in international market as well a
say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
affect the u.s. economy. presumably including cyprus. as well as the improving u.s. job market, and strong housing sector. and as we wait for fed officials to wrap up their meeting tomorrow, it's expected they will leave interest rates unchanged. joining us to talk more about the fed, randall krosner, former fed governor and now professor of economics at the university of chicago. i've not had the benefit of being in those meetings. you have, and i'm curious to know, do you think cyprus came up? if so, how? and how would the fed governors and members of the fomc handicap its possible effects on the u.s. economy? >> it certainly would have come up, i think, if some analogies with iceland from a number of years ago. even a smaller country, only 250,000 people, not a million people, but it was something that we focused on. we worried about and tried to think of what the implications are. here it's clear the europeans have made i think a terrible mistake in making this proposal. that potentially could undermine confidence, and that could have knock-on effects not only for the whole
[inaudible] >> in the supermarket, there's evidence of a cash economy expanding. >> we have suppliers demanding cash. not all of them but some are in a panic situation and are demanding cash payments. >> so everyone is waiting to see whether the government can strike a deal with the e.u. by the deadline of monday and save the country from bankruptcy. the challenge for cyprus and its parliament is how to raise nearly $6 billion and so qualify for a full zureo -- eurozone bailout. the problem is there is tension between cyprus and germany. only today angela merkel was warning that patience has its limits. banking would be restructured with smaller bank accounts protected but larger accounts possibly taking steep losses and there might still be a tax on savings. it was rejected once but might be applied to big deposits. every move is controversial. these bank statue were blocking the roads today. they fear restructuring the banks will lead to layoffs. >> they fear they won't have a job. what do you think will happen? >> whatever is decided here will still have to win the approval of the
the depth and length of this weak economy. in some ways the strongest argument for obama to replace him is a partisan argument. there have been republicans in this job now for more than 20 years. and i think democrats may not want the fed chairman job to be something that is seen as a republican job. now, bernanke is, of course, being criticized much more by republicans than democrats will at this point but he still is originally a republican, there are some, geithner, and summers, and including in blinder who would be serious candidates if persh key were to leave. >> rose: your thought, sir? the scuttlebutt from everybody is that he'll probably have snuff after eight years. i do believe that if he wants a third term and he asked the president for it, he'd probably get it for the reasons david said. he's done a very good-- never mind personal, never mind republican. he's just done a very good job. as david said, he's got republicans a lot angrier than teams, even though he came into this job as a bush appointee from the republican side. so i think if bernanke is an eight-year chairman,
, it has taken us 40 years to build our economy to the level it is. with done one day -- within one day, we have shot it down. we are very betrayed. >> they can do it anywhere. live in europe, europe has betrayed us. >> at one stage, the crowd was urged to march towards the presidential palace. many people believed their savings had been guaranteed. what is clear is that the bailout deal negotiated in brussels cannot be implemented here except in the face of furious opposition. will have depositors to pay -- just reducing the amounts savers and depositors will have to pay probably won't be enough. teeple are still trying to get their money out of cash machines, but there are limits on how much they can withdraw. a parliamentary vote on the bailout has been postponed yet again. the government feared it might not win a majority for the bailout. without extra funding, cyprus faces bankruptcy. the british community around -- the british community, around 60,000, is also assessing its losses. cypriot friends are in shock. >> they felt as though someone had put their hand in their pocket and take
against iran have been effective. he said this was due to the iranian economy is over dependence on oil. he said he was not opposed to direct talks to america about iran's nuclear program. >>> the european union has given cyprus until monday to raise 6 billion euros or risk losing a bailout fund. after public outrage on the island, the government backed away from the planned, asking all bank depositors to pay a one-off tax. now have to come up with the money some other way. gavin hewitt has the latest. >> there is anger and anxiety in cyprus. this was a crowd of bank workers blocking access, and arriving mps had to be lifted over police barricades. protesters fear their bank will collapse. were shaken. why did they shout at you? >> because they're losing money. linesing the day, long had formed at the cash machines as the government's scramble to raise billions of euros to avoid bankruptcy. the lines mainly focused on one bank, rumored to be in difficulty. >> there is a rumor that if somebody does not buy it, it will close. >> at 1 cash machine, they posted the time when there would be
.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, malaysia. so it is not so much a risk
to see to tame these large banks and give us a stable financial system that supports the real economy, not just trading profits of a large financial institution. >> were you surprised by anything you heard at those hearings? >> i was. i viewed i, like a lot of peopl jpmorgan chase as a free will managed bank. i was surprised at them to build these huge positions and even when he started calling foul, the next level of management above him really didn't get on top of it. i was not surprised by appalled by the way they were manipulating their models that are supposed to be able to determine how much risk is involved in various trading positions. >> what advantage did they gain from manipulating those positions? >> well, there were a couple things going on. one was it was clear they were trying to boost their regulatory capital ratios in anticipation of new capital rules coming into effect. this is a key defect with the way regulators bank. regulators view capital adequacy at these large banks. they left those capital ratios to be determined in part by the risk models of the banks. the b
at three bellwethers, fedex, and oracle. >> this is not ready to take off. the economy is not ready to take off. it does give us pause, maybe across the board. economy is slowing down, at least temporarily. >> ben bernanke did calm the markets yesterday. >> at this meeting, the committee judge says no adjustment. >> today, though, as investors look east to europe and ahead to an earnings season promising little profit growth, 2013's charmed life for stocks seems so yesterday. >> more now on the financial troubles in cyprus where the government is trying to come up with a plan to reorganize its banks by monday. that's the deadline set by the european union officials. if they don't, it could mean collapse of the entire banking sector. as michelle caruso-cabrera tells us, that fear is being felt on the streets. >> reporter: cyprus yet another country in europe where the devastation from the financial crisis is being felt throughout the population. throughout cyprus lines could be seen at the atms of the country's weakest bank, people desperate to take out cash because they're on the verge of f
is normal banking business. there is enough money to keep the economy moving forward, but these are very, very difficult days. tomorrow, the banks will be closed again, and quite possibly on friday, too. >> thank you. we are bringing you all of the latest developments from cyprus as they search for a solution there. police have searched the home of kristie in the guard. ofkhristine lasard, the head the international monetary fund. the operator of japan pose the damaged nuclear power plant in fukushima said iraq had been responsible for a loss of power this week. -- said a rat has been responsible for a loss of power this week. a dead rat was found near a switchboard. the company is investigating whether the raft was the cause. that it has killed a french national captured in mali in 2011. it claims it executed the man in retaliation for france's intervention in mali. the french foreign ministry said it is trying to verify those claims. the first test- tube baby was born in the u.k., the country could be leading the way again. this time it is a new idf procedure that creates a baby with t
's on somewhat shaky ground, the economy is bad, and part of the problem is the refugees are a huge pressure point as the king sort of eloquently said today. few of us saw the foreign minister this afternoon who said it's almost as if-- he said it's as if another eight or nine, the king said 10% has been added to our population. the foreign minister said eye asked him the question the king was asked, would you ever shut your doors? and he said we just can't do that. but i have to say my nightmare scenario is i get a call at 3:00 a.m. and i'm told there are 50,000 refugees at the border, what do we do? >> margaret, just to wrap up quickly, we know the bulk of the president's time was spent in israel, trying to patch up relations there, but also calling for new thinking on the part of the israelis and palestinians. have you picked up reaction yet to what the president was saying? >> jied, in the public, especially in the left in israel, there was great-- great joy at what the president had to say about resolving the conflict. but the reaction from people sort of in the political circles was a
the economy has been so weak. >> what about food and gas prices? >> one thing is the defined benefit lifetime retirement program. those are gone. so you are not -- you just don't have enough money if you're retiring to live off of it, and the government is now broke, in effect. they can't step in and make this up. >> how much are they paying down in the government debt? >> well, the government debt is actually not going down, if i may say. so we are going to have a deficit this year of a trillion 300 billion dollars which is $25 billion a week. it's the worst deficit that we've had, and nobody knows. >> social security is easy to fix. you lift the cap right now if >>> predictions. pat. >> immigration reform passes the house. republicans kill it in the senate. >> eleanor. >>next state to legalize gay marriage. >> what state? >> illinois. >> susan. >> immigration reform is going to run into big trouble in congress. >> really. mort. >> what i think the economy is going to remain >>> i predict that president abi of japan trying to revitalize his economy by loosening its grip on inflation will ove
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
. >> sreenivasan: the federal reserve stood by its aggressive plan to stimulate the u.s. economy, keeping short-term interest rates at record lows. and it said there are signs the economy is getting stronger. one of those signs-- unemployment-- fell to a four- year low of 7.7% in february. still, the fed predicted it won't reach 6.5% until 2015. the fed and its chairman, ben bernanke, also had words of caution for congress. >> i do believe that long-term fiscal stability is extremely important and i urge congress and the administration, as i always do when i go to testify, to do whatever is necessary to put us on a sustainable fiscal path going forward. but in doing so, i think it's a good idea to pay attention to the impacts in the near term on what is still not a completely satisfactory recovery. >> sreenivasan: congress moved a step closer to advancing a spending bill that would keep the federal government running through september. the senate passed the legislation this afternoon along bipartisan lines. the measure funds the day-to-day operating budgets of every cabinet agency, gives $87 bi
question. if we can't economy commitment and assurance which i've made publicly to the american people and to you privately that all options remain on the table, including the prospect which the president, charlie, does not want to do of unilaterally using military force to deal with iran's putative nuclear program. >> rose: so therefore the question is do you have any reason to doubt the president that he believes all other options have failed and iran is about to a year from now get a nuclear weapon and the ability to deliver it that he would not act? plunging markets notwithstanding the >> rising oil prices, a threat to american economic recovery, a generational war with iranians, all of that notwithstanding i believe that if it's unmistakably clear and this that the iranians are breaking out to acquire aweapon that this president will, in fact, use military force. it's not my preferreded option. it clouds the whole option of what the end state would be but i believe, yes he will use military force. >> rose: you agree? >> i think so, too. it's not just about the israelis as well. it
for the survival of the cypriot economy. >> reporter: by the evening, however, news firmed up about the plan to split likely banks and its staff marched on parliament in the first really tense protests in this country's crisis. this evening, the queues at the cash machines grew even longer as they ran dry. parliament also is considering capital controls, stock money being taken out of this country. >> holman: late tonight, a new proposal was floated in parliament to create a fund using revenue from natural resources, bonds and other assets. but debate was delayed until friday. the u.n. agreed today to launch an investigation into the possible use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian government and rebels have accused each other of using them in an attack in aleppo this week. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon said the investigation will begin as soon as possible, but not overnight. >> the investigation mission is to look into the specific incident brought to my attention by the syrian government. in discharging its mandate of an investigation mission, full cooperation from all parties w
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a decade after the iraq war began, the violence has not abated. today was the bloodiest day this year, as insurgents staged multiple attacks. a high-level minister was assassinated and dozens more died. a warning: our story contains some graphic images. thick, black smoke rose above the sadr city district in baghdad, where a car bomb went off today, in one of several coordinated attacks to rock the iraqi capital. 65 people were killed and more than 100 wounded. in another instance, an explosion ripped through a popular market near baghdad's fortified green zone. >> there is a checkpoint at the main gate, but it is in vain. they do not s
. >> the muslim brotherhood needs us. i mean their economy is going to hell. they have got a real problems. they need imf financing. so we need to engage with them but we also need to stand on our principleses. >> rose: whatever happened to the idea expressed at this table that in an interesting way the responsibility of governing might make islamist parties change. they would face a new reality and that therefore they would understand more than they did when they were outside of power, what it meant. and they would make different choices. >> the answer is that there is no universal-- there is no universal answer for this. because asian is lam with countrieses like indonesia and malaysia is one thing. turkey is another, hezbollah and lebanon, egypt, i agree is yet another so there is not one formula. islam is diverse and it will vary from one country to the other. in some countries, islam is in time will become a pragmatic. in other countries, it would be an ongoing revolution, radicallization. >> we have not been clear enough, john kerry has done this on his last trip but we need to be mo
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)